Ted Noten

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Ted Noten’s pork chop bag is quite gross. The fat on the meat is very evident and the resin manages to catch all the curves and crevices, accentuating the ugly qualities. I like that he makes womens’ handbags transparent so everyone can see what secrets she keeps inside.

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Noten encouraged gallery visitors to punch a clay punching bag and to his surprise the imprints of their knuckles were so deep and defined that the rings of the participants were detailed in the work. I am drawn to this experiment because it is so very original and the act of participation added an unforeseen, personal element to the work that comes back to jewellery.

The Curiosity Shop

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I visited St Andrews for the day and struck up a conversation with Dave, the owner of The Curiosity Shop. He was very interested in the fact I make jewellery and offered me a space to display my work and details. I am very pleased to have met Dave, he has given me so much advice for promoting myself and on building a business. His mentorship has given me more confidence in my own work and has helped me get my head around finishing my university degree.

Cutaneous

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Anna Stretton painted these for her graduate exhibition in 2011. She went to the Queensland College of Art, where I also study. The simplicity and application of colour caught my eye, then I read her artist statement which resonates very well with me and my practice.

Skin is our physical identity. It records time through its traumas and ageing. Skin changes colour, wrinkles, bruises, is cut and damaged. It scars permanently creating physical memories and recording events. The body projects it’s reaction in furious colour, with bruising, wounds and scars. The body recovers and the skin has recorded another experience.

Masumi Kataoka

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Masumi Kataoka makes jewellery that resembles animal intestines. They represent the metaphorical home of our emotions which can sometimes be over the top and ugly. Kataoka’s work is beautifully simple and though still grotesque, the use of animal innards draws the viewer in.

When I thought more about the statement ‘we are not made of glass’, I considered ways of creating exposed organs to highlight the strength and importance of our protective layer. I came across Kataoka’s intestine series which encouraged me to keep my focus on bruises as the paths seemed too similar.

We Are Not Made of Glass

The other day when chatting to my boyfriend he said something that stuck with me- ‘we are not made of glass’. He thinks that everyone should play at least one game of rugby in their lives to prove this to themselves. That’s not going to happen, but it made me think how true this statement is. Our bodies can take force without breaking (to an extent), where bruises and wounds are left behind as evidence. This simple comment has encouraged me, it has brought new ways to approach my existing concept and articulates the developing theme perfectly.

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Above is a black and white photocopy of my hand printed bruises. I have traced around the different tones creating layers that show a very different side to the bruises. I am seeing these images as cracked glass and really enjoy the exaggerated contours of the line.